Hakuun Yasutani (right of photograph) (安谷 白雲 Yasutani Hakuun?, 1885–1973) was a Sōtō Rōshi, the founder of the Sanbo Kyodan Zen Buddhist organization. Ryōkō Yasutani (安谷 量衡) was born in Japan in Shizuoka Prefecture. His family was very poor, and therefore he was adopted by another family.[1] When he was five he was sent to Fukuji-in, a small Rinzai-temple under the guidance of Tsuyama Genpo.[1]
Yasutani saw himself becoming a Zen-priest as destined:

There is a miraculous story about his birth: His mother had already decided that her next son would be a priest when she was given a bead off a rosary by a nun who instructed her to swallow it for a safe childbirth. When he was born his left hand was tightly clasped around that same bead.
via wikipedia.com  

Hakuun Yasutani (right of photograph) (安谷 白雲 Yasutani Hakuun?, 1885–1973) was a Sōtō Rōshi, the founder of the Sanbo Kyodan Zen Buddhist organization. Ryōkō Yasutani (安谷 量衡) was born in Japan in Shizuoka Prefecture. His family was very poor, and therefore he was adopted by another family.[1] When he was five he was sent to Fukuji-in, a small Rinzai-temple under the guidance of Tsuyama Genpo.[1]

Yasutani saw himself becoming a Zen-priest as destined:

There is a miraculous story about his birth: His mother had already decided that her next son would be a priest when she was given a bead off a rosary by a nun who instructed her to swallow it for a safe childbirth. When he was born his left hand was tightly clasped around that same bead.

via wikipedia.com  

I compare myself with my former self, not with others. Not only that, I tend to compare my current self with the best I have been, which is when I have been midly manic. When I am my present “normal” self, I am far removed from when I have been my liveliest, most productive, most intense, most outgoing and effervescent. In sort, for myself, I am a hard act to follow.

Kay Redfield Jamison

The doctor’s words made me understand what happened to me was a dark, evil, and shameful secret, and by association I too was dark, evil, and shameful. While it may not have been their intention, this was the message my clouded mind received. To escape the confines of the hospital, I once again disassociated myself from my emotions and numbed myself to the pain ravaging my body and mind. I acted as if nothing was wrong and went back to performing the necessary motions to get me from one day to the next. I existed but I did not live.

Alyssa Reyans

If a person comes to the door of poetry untouched by the madness of the Muses, believing that technique alone will make them a good poet, they and their sane compositions never reach perfection, but are utterly eclipsed by the performances of the inspired madman.

Socrates

One set of causes are to be found in the invalidating home environment. As we know BPDs suffered intense invalidations of their unconscious needs during their first years of life. A BPD learns that his/her natural needs aren’t normal and welcomed, and that he/she must suppress them in order to gain approval and acceptance from significant adults. In other words, the BPD learns that he/she is not good as he/she is. Such situations create the first major identity crisis.

Michael Weisz, Identity Crisis In BPD

Humanity has become a house of horrors. Diseases of the soul are the norm. 

In summary, we see one aspect of compassionate mind training as a way to stimulate new pathways in the brain that enable development of a new self-to-self relationship, based on a ‘care and concern’ social mentality. This mentality conceptualises, thinks and feels about relationships in very different ways to that of the social rank (dominant-subordinate) mentality. The aim is to tone down dominate-subordinate self-to-self relating, reduce shame, replace unhelpful defensive-safety behaviours and stimulate self-reassuring and self-caring/soothing relationships. This training needs to operate at both implicit and explicate levels of self-relating.

Paul Gilbert and Chris Irons, Focused Therapies and Compassionate Mind Training for Shame and Self-Attacking

Compassion; Conceptualisations, Research and Use in Psychotherapy

An intimate relationship does not banish loneliness. Only when we are comfortable with who we are can we truly function independently in a healthy way, can we truly function within a relationship. Two halves do not make a whole when it comes to a healthy relationship: it takes two wholes.

Patricia Fry (via childrenofthetao)