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hxni

The Breath of the Spirit - A Short Guidebook on Breathing and Meditation [available now on Payhip] http://payhip.com/b/UE9n

The things that are easier said than done are suppose to be done.

Action breathes new life. 

While the physical and mental diseases are attended to in their own terms in Tibetan medicine, the ultimate goal of complete mental health, enlightenment, is never really out of the picture. In fact, the philosophical and psychological underpinnings of all Tibetan medicine come from Buddhism. The fundamental principle at work here is that, as the Buddha said, “Mind precedes all things and is their chief”. Mind creates illness and mind creates wellness. This is the basic psychosomatic assumption of Tibetan medicine and Tibetan psychiatry.

—Dr. Terry Clifford, Ph. D., Tibetan Psychiatry and Mental Health (via modernshxmxn)

The foundation of the body is the heart which is the residence of essence…By assembling essence in its residence, it will by and by and enter into the blood, the blood, the body will gradually lose all appearance and feelings of weakness and pain. (Su 1910: 10.4b-5a)

Chunqiu fanlu, 春秋繁露 (Explanations of the Spring and Autumn Annals)

"This description of essence as being first assembled in the heart and then passed on into the body allows the concrete understanding of the blood as energy and of the mind as energy in ancient Chinese thought. The mind is consequently thought of as fluid residing in one or the other organ and circulating freely around the body—carried, perhaps, by the energy of the blood.”

Hidemi Ishida, Body and Mind

(via modernshxmxn)

Our true nature is identical with the Primordial Buddha, but due to our obscurations we have forgotten our true nature and so wander in samsara. The example is often given that our true nature is like the sky-open, spacious, unending and unbeginning. Our mental defilements and obscurations are like clouds. The purpose of the tantric Buddhist practices is to remove and transform the obscurations so that we rediscover and realize our Buddha-identity.

—Terry Clifford, Tibetan Buddhist Medicine and Psychiatry. (via modernshxmxn)

When did maturity and empathy go out of style?

*yawn*

(Source: yourlittlebear)

(Source: galixies)

Inspiring Book of the Week

"Livia Kohn is one of the very best and most prolific Taoist scholars in the world. Here, she draws upon the revolution in Taoist scholarship during the past few decades, and provides a much needed representative anthology of primary Taoist texts, making these important materials available to the non-specialist scholar, to students, and to the general public." — Norman Girardot, Lehigh University"This is a work whose time has come, a landmark that bears testimony to the coming of age of Taoist studies in the West. The author’s erudition and enthusiasm give the work a special sparkle, and communicate a sense of excitement that brings these literary artifacts to life. Well conceived, well organized, and well executed by a scholar uniquely qualified for the task." — Douglas Wile, Brooklyn CollegeContaining sixty translations from a large variety of texts, this is an accessible yet thorough introduction to the major concepts, doctrines, and practices of Taoism. It presents the philosophy, rituals, and health techniques of the ancients as well as the practices and ideas of Taoists today. Divided into four sections, it follows the Taoist Path: The Tao, Long Life, Eternal Vision, and Immortality. It shows how the world of the Tao is perceived from within the tradition, what fervent Taoists did, and how practitioners saw their path and goals. The Taoist Experience is unique in that it presents the whole of Taoist tradition in the very words of its active practitioners. It conveys not only a sense of the depth of the Taoist religious experience but also of the underlying unity of the various schools and strands.
via amazon.com
I must have read this entire book at least half a dozen times. Dr. Livia Kohn does an amazing job sharing the wonder, magic, and healing of Taoism. A religion that has supported me so much in my journey of healing. One of my favourite sections are Immortal Lands, Queen Mother of the West, The Tao..honestly the whole book. The illustrations are wonderful. I’m so grateful for this woman’s work.
Ask your local library to order a copy! :)

Inspiring Book of the Week

"Livia Kohn is one of the very best and most prolific Taoist scholars in the world. Here, she draws upon the revolution in Taoist scholarship during the past few decades, and provides a much needed representative anthology of primary Taoist texts, making these important materials available to the non-specialist scholar, to students, and to the general public." — Norman Girardot, Lehigh University

"This is a work whose time has come, a landmark that bears testimony to the coming of age of Taoist studies in the West. The author’s erudition and enthusiasm give the work a special sparkle, and communicate a sense of excitement that brings these literary artifacts to life. Well conceived, well organized, and well executed by a scholar uniquely qualified for the task." — Douglas Wile, Brooklyn College

Containing sixty translations from a large variety of texts, this is an accessible yet thorough introduction to the major concepts, doctrines, and practices of Taoism. It presents the philosophy, rituals, and health techniques of the ancients as well as the practices and ideas of Taoists today. Divided into four sections, it follows the Taoist Path: The Tao, Long Life, Eternal Vision, and Immortality. It shows how the world of the Tao is perceived from within the tradition, what fervent Taoists did, and how practitioners saw their path and goals. The Taoist Experience is unique in that it presents the whole of Taoist tradition in the very words of its active practitioners. It conveys not only a sense of the depth of the Taoist religious experience but also of the underlying unity of the various schools and strands.

via amazon.com

I must have read this entire book at least half a dozen times. Dr. Livia Kohn does an amazing job sharing the wonder, magic, and healing of Taoism. A religion that has supported me so much in my journey of healing. One of my favourite sections are Immortal Lands, Queen Mother of the West, The Tao..honestly the whole book. The illustrations are wonderful. I’m so grateful for this woman’s work.

Ask your local library to order a copy! :)

You must cultivate the feeling that a warrior needs nothing. You have everything needed for the extravagant journey that is your life. I have tried to teach you that the real experience is to be a human, and that what counts is being alive; life is the little detour that we are taking now. Life in itself is sufficient, self-explanatory and complete. A warrior understands this and lives accordingly; therefore, one may say without being presumptuous that the experience of experiences is being a warrior. If a warrior needs solace, they simply chooses anyone and expresses to that person every detail of their turmoil. After all, the warrior is not seeking to be understood or helped; by talking they are merely relieving themselves of their pressure. That is, providing that the warrior is given to talking; if they are not, they tell no one.

—Don Juan Matus, Tales of Power.

Nothing in the world is weaker than water
but against the hard and the strong nothing excels it
for nothing can change it
the soft overcomes the hard
the weak overcomes the strong
this is something everyone knows but no one is able to practice
thus the sage declares who accepts a country’s disgrace we call the lord of soil and grain
who accepts a country’s misfortune we call king of all under Heaven
upright words sound upside down

Dao de jing Chapter 78

Translated by Bill Porter (Red Pine), 1996.

We’re centre of the universe, and nothing but a spec of dust in the Milky Way.

The human experience is truly remarkable. The ultimate paradox.

Trauma impels people both to withdraw from close relationships and to seek them desperately. The profound disruption in basic trust, the common feelings of shame, guilt, and inferiority, and the need to avoid reminders of the trauma that might be found in social life, all foster withdrawal from close relationships. But the terror of the traumatic event intensifies the need for protective attachments. The traumatized person therefore frequently alternates between isolation and anxious clinging to others. […] It results in the formation of intense, unstable relationships that fluctuate between extremes.

—Judith Herman, “Trauma and Recovery” (via lavenderlabia)

(Source: psychologicalsnippets, via fyeahborderlinepeople)

And it’s amazing; [borderline people’s] ability to take care of someone else, to give the right answer of what you would do for that person, is very different from what they would do for themselves. Because my belief—and I’m sure it’s not only my belief—is that the borderline patient really essentially inside feels unlovable. Feels like there’s something missing, that they’re not worthy of love. And so they tend to seek out people who validate that—and if they do find someone who doesn’t validate that, they try to sabotage that relationship to keep that myth alive.

…And while that idea saved them—in their childhood or their youth or infancy—it is now actually killing them.

Ivan Spielbergtalks about treating borderline people in the video “A Look at Borderline Personality Disorder - Part 2” (via fyeahborderlinepeople)

(via across-the-borderline)

In fact, good feelings (ganqing) are best seen as unfolding through how one behaves within the social context. This is true especially among intimate relations. In these relations, ganqing hao is often described as moqi (tacit coordination between the parties developed through intimate interactions on a daily basis). Anticipating the other’s needs and acting accordingly without being explicitly told is most valued manifestation of ganqing. It takes a lot of good feelings to be aware of the situation that others are in and to care enough to take actions accordingly. It is in reciprocation of doing things for each other that ganqing is created and substantiated. “Ganqing exists only when sentiment, emotional attachment, and good feelings are felt by people involved in social interactions.” As Schoenhals points out, “[h]elping others to do things they cannot do alone, even mundane things, has great significance for the Chinese, as it is a primary means of expressing friendship and love.”

—Yanhua Zhang, Transforming Emotions with Chinese Medicine: An Ethnographic Account from Contemporary China.

Nº. 1 of  73